BY JOVAN KRSTEVSKI

For professional divers, the Oris high-performance ProDiver watch resembles the proper evolution of a tool watch. I see it this way not just because of the clear and concise developments made on the watch over time but because of its flexibility.

Oris has indeed a long consolidated background in diving watches. While the new releases have been made to appease the normal wearers more like lifestyle watches, this time around, the brand is revisiting its originally rugged and proper tool-ish designs. So the new Oris high-performance ProDiver is basically made with the pro crowd in mind. Moreover, this new watch proves that a chronograph can be a proper diving tool too. It features a practical safety device for the bezel and a water-resistance of an impressive 1,000 m.

I just think the additional chronograph will divide opinions about the reliability of the watch since you want the watch to have as little holes as possible, that’s why you protect that single crown and locked down the caseback. And I think pro divers won’t really make sense of the chronograph but Oris thinks otherwise. Oris believes that a diving chronograph is relevant and proves it with this new Dive Control Limited Edition and its robust, ultra-waterproof case.

The case is massive at 51mm but still comfortable to wear thanks to its short lugs. It comes in full black look with a titanium case and PVD coating. We also see the usual wave pattern in the background on the dial along with yellow accents that also goes to the pushers.

The brand promises water-tightness so we see a screw-in crown and screwed pushers, as well as a plain titanium caseback and an automatic helium escape valve. Surviving the pressure at 1-kilometer depth is no easy task so yes, this is indeed a proper tool watch even with the added chronograph. Furthermore, the watch wears on a black rubber strap with an additional yellow rubber strap included in the box.

I believe that the presence of a chronograph makes this diver’s watch truly unique. We all know that a chronograph is more precise than the rotating bezel when it comes to timing elapsed times so it might really prove useful to the pro crowd but they have to re-train themselves and I think this new addition will also be tested over time. However, there is an additional safety device on the bezel that will ensure a kind of a failsafe. In order to avoid false calculations, the bezel features the Oris-patented Rotation Safety System, or RSS, a signature device that securely locks the unidirectional rotating bezel in place during a dive. To adjust the bezel, you first pull it up, rotate it and finally lock it back in place.

Powering the watch is the Oris Calibre 774, a slightly modified movement based on a Sellita SW–500. This is a solid automatic chronograph producing 48 hours of power reserve. It also features the typical 6–9–12 chronograph layout and date at 6 o’clock.

Finally, the Oris Dive Control Limited Edition comes in only 500 pieces and priced at CHF 4,850. Visit Oris here.